' Adam Stefanick | MTTLR

FCC Aims to Flex Muscle to Remove State Barriers to Municipal Internet

On June 10, 2014, FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler published an op-ed championing municipality-funded broadband. Noting Chattanooga, Tennessee’s past as a 19th century railroad boom town, he juxtaposed the city’s history with its recent decision to fund its own gigabit-per-second infrastructure: “Chattanooga’s investment has not only helped ensure that all its citizens have Internet access, it’s made this mid-size city in the Tennessee Valley a hub for the high-tech jobs people usually associate with Silicon Valley. Amazon has cited Chattanooga’s world-leading networks as a reason for locating a distribution center in the area, as has Volkswagen when it chose Chattanooga as its headquarters for North American manufacturing. Chattanooga is also emerging as an incubator for tech start-ups. Mayor Berke told me people have begun calling Chattanooga “Gig City” – a big change for a city famous for its choo-choos.” Mr. Wheeler then delivered his punchline: “I believe it is in the best interests of consumers and competition that the FCC exercises its power to preempt state laws that ban or restrict competition from community broadband. Given the opportunity, we will do so.” Fast-forwarding to the present, Chairman Wheeler just announced on Monday that he is circulating a proposed Order to his fellow FCC commissioners encouraging FCC preemption of state laws that stymie municipality-sponsored broadband projects via its granted authority under Section 706 of the Communications Act. The announcement comes a few weeks after President Obama himself pushed for increased support of community internet, with the White House publishing a detailed policy report extolling its virtues. Proponents applaud the move as facilitating the growth of high-speed internet in communities where major...

New iOS and Android Encryption Protections Spark Privacy Debate

On September 17, Apple updated its privacy policy to reflect privacy enhancements added to its most recent iteration of its iPhone mobile operating system, iOS 8. Notably, the update highlighted iOS 8’s new protection for user phone data: out-of-the-box passcode encryption that the company itself cannot bypass. Similarly, Google recently related to the Washington Post that Google’s latest mobile operating system offering, Android L, would also include default user-end passcode encryption that cannot not be circumvented by Google. ALCU technologist Christopher Soghoian and Center for Democracy & Technology technologist Joseph Lorenzo Hall applauded the moves to enhance consumer protections in the wake of increased government surveillance stoked by Edward Snowden’s leaks last summer. But not all are pleased with the announcements. Notably, Ronald H. Hosko, President of the Law Enforcement Legal Defense Fund and former Assistant Director of the FBI Criminal Investigative Division, criticized the moves in a recent op-ed as protecting “those who desperately need to be stopped from lawful, authorized, and entirely necessary safety and security efforts.” Hosko’s point indicates a possible shift in the legal landscape of digital privacy rights. In its recent Riley v. California opinion, the Supreme Court weighed in on the digital privacy debate, holding that authorities generally may not search digital information on a cell phone seized from an individual without a warrant. However, even upon obtaining a warrant for user data, police now face an additional difficulty, as they can no longer can lean on Google or Apple to procure this data. As Apple itself pointed out in its revamped privacy policy, with the addition of these new encryption protections, “…it’s...