' Yifan Cao | MTTLR

AI v. Lawyers: Will AI Take My Legal Job?

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is changing the global workforce, generating fears that it will put masses of people out of work. Indeed, some job loss is likely as computers, intelligent machines, and robots take over certain tasks done by humans. For example, passenger cars and semi-trailer trucks will be able to drive themselves in the future, and that means that there won’t be a need for quite as many drivers. Elon Musk, the co-founder and CEO of Tesla and SpaceX, predicts that so many jobs will be replaced by intelligent machines and robots in the future that eventually “people will have less work to do and ultimately will be sustained by payments from the government.” The World Economic Forum concluded in a recent report that “a new generation of smart machines, fueled by rapid advances in artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics, could potentially replace a large proportion of existing human jobs.”   All of this raises the question of whether lawyers and even judges will eventually be replaced with algorithms. As one observer noted, “The law is in many ways particularly conducive to the application of AI and machine learning.” For example, legal rulings in a common law system involve deriving axioms from precedent, applying those axioms to the particular facts at hand, and reaching conclusions accordingly. Similarly, AI systems also learn to make decisions based on training data and apply the inferred rules to new situations. A growing number of companies are building machine learning models that ask the AI to assess a host of factors—from the corpus of relevant precedent, venue, to a case’s particular fact pattern–to predict the outcomes of pending cases.  ...