' Legal/Tech News | MTTLR

Obama Administration to Weigh in on Google v. Oracle Java Dispute

Last month, the Supreme Court invited input from the Department of Justice regarding the ongoing Java dispute between Google and Oracle, asking for advice on whether the Court should hear the case. According to the Court’s memo, U.S. Solicitor General Donald Verrilli, Jr. “is invited to file a brief in this case expressing the views of the United States.” Technology Analyst Al Hilwa calls this a “true 2015 nail-biter for the industry” because “[t]his is a judgment on what might constitute fair use in the context of software.” The dispute between Google and Oracle began in 2010, when Oracle sued Google seeking $1 billion in damages on the claim that Google had used Oracle Java software to design the operating system for the Android smartphone. Google wrote its own version of Java when it implemented the Android OS, but in order to allow software developers to write their own programs for Android, Google relied on Java Application Programming Interfaces (“APIs”). These APIs are “specifications that allow programs to communicate with each other,” even though they may be written by different people. Oracle alleged that Google copied 37 packages of prewritten Java programs when it should have licensed them or written entirely new code. Google responded with the argument that such code is not copyrightable under §102(b) of the Copyright Act, which withholds copyright protection from “any idea, procedure, process, system, method of operation, concept, principle, or discovery, regardless of the form in which it is described, explained, illustrated, or embodied in [an original work of authorship].” Google also argued that the copied elements were “a key part of allowing...

FCC Aims to Flex Muscle to Remove State Barriers to Municipal Internet

On June 10, 2014, FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler published an op-ed championing municipality-funded broadband. Noting Chattanooga, Tennessee’s past as a 19th century railroad boom town, he juxtaposed the city’s history with its recent decision to fund its own gigabit-per-second infrastructure: “Chattanooga’s investment has not only helped ensure that all its citizens have Internet access, it’s made this mid-size city in the Tennessee Valley a hub for the high-tech jobs people usually associate with Silicon Valley. Amazon has cited Chattanooga’s world-leading networks as a reason for locating a distribution center in the area, as has Volkswagen when it chose Chattanooga as its headquarters for North American manufacturing. Chattanooga is also emerging as an incubator for tech start-ups. Mayor Berke told me people have begun calling Chattanooga “Gig City” – a big change for a city famous for its choo-choos.” Mr. Wheeler then delivered his punchline: “I believe it is in the best interests of consumers and competition that the FCC exercises its power to preempt state laws that ban or restrict competition from community broadband. Given the opportunity, we will do so.” Fast-forwarding to the present, Chairman Wheeler just announced on Monday that he is circulating a proposed Order to his fellow FCC commissioners encouraging FCC preemption of state laws that stymie municipality-sponsored broadband projects via its granted authority under Section 706 of the Communications Act. The announcement comes a few weeks after President Obama himself pushed for increased support of community internet, with the White House publishing a detailed policy report extolling its virtues. Proponents applaud the move as facilitating the growth of high-speed internet in communities where major...

The Right to be Forgotten

This past May, the Court of Justice of the European Union approved “the right to be forgotten” in a case brought by Mario Costeja against a newspaper and Google, a move which fundamentally changed our notions of Internet privacy. More than a decade earlier, Costeja had posted two notices about an auction of his property to pay off debt, and the links to the notices were still appearing in the search results when Googling his name. Costeja brought suit in an effort to remove the links from the search results. The court said the links could be removed if they were found to be “inadequate, irrelevant or no longer relevant.” Under the right to be forgotten, only searches that include a person’s name will provoke the search result removal, which means that the articles or website can still show up in the results if the search is under a different keyword. The European Union’s right to be forgotten has spurred much concern for free speech campaigners, who claim the ruling unjustly limits what can be published online. Privacy advocates, however, are praising the ruling for allowing people some exercise of power over what content appears about them online. This new right creates a process for people to remove links to embarrassing, outdated, and otherwise unwanted content from Google and other search engines’ results. Courts are directed to balance the public’s interest in access to the information in question and the privacy interests of the person affected by the content. As of now, the ruling applies only to Google’s local European sites, such as Google.de in Germany, Google.fr in France,...

Will federal legislation make consumers’ private information safer?

After JP Morgan’s computers were penetrated in the early summer of 2014 by hackers, exposing the personal information of the firm’s customers, the firm did not disclose the breach until late in the summer.[1] Over 76 million customers’ contact information—phone numbers and email addresses—were stolen.[2] The Connecticut and Illinois Attorney Generals started scrutinizing JP Morgan’s delayed notification to their customers that their contact information was obtained by hackers, taking issue with the fact that JP Morgan “only revealed…limited details” about the extent of the breach.[3] Both attorneys general are assessing whether JP Morgan complied with their state privacy laws—mainly their state’s data breach notification laws. With the size of JP Morgan and with 76 million customer information breached, it is safe to assume that residents of Connecticut and Illinois were not the only ones whose personal information was compromised. Data breach has become a big issue not only for JP Morgan, but for many other companies. The same hackers who breached JP Morgan’s security wall attempted to get customer data from Deutsche Bank, Bank of America, Fidelity and other financial institutions.[4] Hackers breached Target and Home Depot’s customer credit information, taking 40 million of Targets’ customer credit card information and 56 million of Home Depot’s customer credit card information.[5] Data breach and data lost seem to be inevitable, whether it is through someone working internally for an organization—à la Edward Snowden—or through hackers— like in the case of JP Morgan, Home Depot and Target. Regardless of how data is lost, there is a need to evaluate the best approach in notify a consumer when someone else obtain a consumer’s...

Gas, Electric, Water, and…Internet?

In the midst of the battle for the future of the Internet, President Barack Obama has made his allegiance clear. Obama released a statement on November 10th urging the FCC to adopt new regulations that would treat the Internet like a utility in order to preserve a “free and open internet.” The President’s plan endorses an idea that has become popularly known as “net neutrality.” Proponents of net neutrality claim that it would prevent Internet service providers (ISPs) from picking winners and losers online, which they claim would effectively destroy the open Internet. In his recent statement, Obama outlined several bright line rules which would prevent ISPs from blocking content from customer access, prohibit throttling, increase transparency, and forbid paid prioritization. In order for the FCC to accomplish these goals, President Obama advised that the Commission must adopt the strictest rules possible, which would require broadband service to be treated as a public utility. Opponents of President Obama’s plan argue that treating the Internet like a utility would slow innovation and raise costs, equating the potential FCC regulations to “micromanagement.” Many who oppose the plan argue that the move would increase bureaucracy and cause inefficiency; rather than add it to the list of government-controlled infrastructure, they believe that the open market is the best method of meeting consumer needs. Classifying the Internet as a utility would entail treating ISPs as common carriers, which are governed by Title II of the 1934 Telecommunications Act. Currently, ISPs are classified as information services. Section 706 of the 1996 Telecommunications Act, which governs the FCC’s oversight of broadband services provided by ISPs, grants...

The Broader Benefit of Benefit Corporations

Ello, an ad-free social network, recently closed another round of venture funding, raising $5.5M. Exciting right? Another social media start-up getting some Series A funding. While $5.5M is surely nothing to sneeze at, perhaps the more interesting feature of this next stage of Ello’s life is that it’s registered itself as a public benefit corporation, enshrining in its corporate charter as a “public benefit” that it will never show ads or sell user data. To date, 27 states have enacted legislation recognizing “Benefit corporations,” entities that give directors legal protection to pursue social and environmental goals over maximizing investor returns. According to benefitcorp.net, a defining characteristic of benefit corporations is that “they are required to create a material positive impact on society and the environment.” One of the largest early adopters of the benefit corporation form was outdoor clothing and gear company Patagonia. In doing so, Patagonia sought a structure that would prevent shareholders from suing it in the pursuit of costly environment initiatives, such as donations to environmental organizations and support of renewable energy sources, that allowed it to serve the welfare of the global community. Warby Parker, with its initiatives ranging from staying carbon neutral, to providing lost cost eyewear to those in need, and even sponsoring a local Little League team, similarly sought the insulation of its directors through the benefit corporation structure. In both examples, the benefit corporation produces a direct, measurable and concrete positive impact on their communities and the environment. Ello’s election to benefit corporation status brings with it a tweak to what we’ve seen so far. Even though Ello has registered as...