Recent Article

A Survey of Legal Issues Arising from the Deployment of Autonomous and Connected Vehicles

By  Daniel A. Crane, Kyle D. Logue, & Bryce C. Pilz

Article, Spring 2017

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Recent Comment

A Comment on Privacy and Accountability in Black-Box Medicine

By Carl E. Schneider

Comment, Spring 2017

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Recent Notes

Steering Consumers Toward Driverless Vehicles: A Federal Rebate Program as a Catalyst for Early Technology Adoption

By Marie Williams

Note, Spring 2017

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New Threats to Vehicle Safety: How Cybersecurity Policy Will Shape the Future of Autonomous Vehicles

By Caleb Kennedy

Note, Spring 2017

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Jailbreak!: What Happens When Autonomous Vehicle Owners Hack Into Their Own Cars

By Michael Sinanian

Note, Spring 2017

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Blog Posts

Should Lawyers be Afraid of Artificial Intelligence?

There is a 3.5 percent chance that lawyers’ jobs will be automated. That statistic seems appealing to those of us in the profession—especially relative to the chances for other “skilled” professions like financial advisers (58 percent of automation) and accountants (94 percent). However, this figure does not stand for the proposition that lawyer’ jobs will remain unchanged as the tendrils of artificial intelligence (AI) wind their way into jobs once thought too complex to be done by machines.

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Health-Apps: Increasing Danger for Data Privacy

Wearable fitness trackers and wellness app technology use innovation to let consumers quantify and track their health. One burgeoning trend is the smartwatch. Smartwatches are equipped to track exercise, heart rate, GPS location of the wearer, and just about anything else. … Amidst market competition and growing consumer interest in tracking individual health, the market for wearable smartwatches has grown almost 70% in 2017. This increased interest and flourishing market for health insights, has consequently inspired scientific innovators to turn their attention to fashioning technology that can track actual medical conditions — such as asthma — and that can diagnose diseases. While this innovation introduces much needed preventative healthcare apps that can be accessible to a high volume of the population, it also raises serious questions about data privacy and fraud that must be considered.

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Equifax and What It Means for Cybersecurity

On September 7, 2017 Equifax announced a data breach that compromised the personal data of over 143 million Americans. Despite this breach occurring in May, Equifax did not find out about it until July, after which it waited until August to report it to the FBI and September to report it to the public. To make matters worse, Equifax had been alerted about a potential vulnerability in its system by the Department of Homeland Security in March of that year, yet took no steps toward implementing the suggested fix. As a result, millions of people have been put at risk of identity theft.

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Tesla Unlocks Extra Range for Irma Evacuees: No Good Deed Goes Unpunished.

As Hurricane Irma headed toward Florida, thousands of people evacuated. Electric car owners were no exception, and some Tesla owners received an unexpected boon: a software update that unlocked the full range of battery power available on their vehicles, giving owners additional mileage in order to flee the coming storm. But Tesla’s actions also drew the eye, and the ire, of the internet community.

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“I See You ICO”: The SEC Regulates Tokens

As a decentralized ledger, blockchain enables users to exchange digital assets — called tokens — without a middleman. The earliest tokens functioned as currency.  No entity issued this currency; instead, the algorithm underlying blockchain dispersed tokens to miners, compensating them for processing blocks.  As cryptocurrencies have proliferated, tokens have found broader uses. Now entities issue tokens to fund projects.

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Should Domain Registrars Ban Hate Speech?

Although hate groups have organized online since the beginning of the internet, there has been an increased awareness of their activities since the deadly “Unite the Right” protest earlier this month in Charlottesville, Virginia. One of the most prominent of these “white nationalist” websites calls itself the Daily Stormer, and was a home for neo-Nazis, white supremacists, and other “alt-right” groups online.  Groups like the Southern Poverty Law Center and Anti-Defamation League had been pressuring domain registrar GoDaddy.com to drop the Daily Stormer as a customer.

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