' Landen Haney | MTTLR

Limitations on AI in the Legal Market

In the last 50 years, society has achieved a level of sophistication sufficient to set the stage for an explosion in AI development. As AI continues to evolve, it will become cheaper and more user friendly. Cheaper and easier to use AI will provide an incentive for more firms to invest. As more firms invest, AI use will become the norm. In many ways, the rapid development of AI can look like an ominous cloud to those with careers in the legal market. For some, like paralegals and research assistants, AI could mean a career death sentence. Although AI is indeed poised to alter the legal profession fundamentally, AI also has critical shortcomings. AI’s two core flaws should give those working in the legal market faith that they are not replaceable. Impartiality and Bias             AI programs excel in the realm of fact. From chess-playing software to self-driving cars, AI has demonstrated an ability to perform factual tasks as well as, if not better, than humans. That is to say, in scenarios with clear-cut rights and wrongs, AI is on pace to outperform human capabilities. It is reasonable to conclude that AI is trending towards becoming a master of fact. However, even if AI is appropriately limited to the realm of fact, AI’s ability to analyze facts also has serious deficiencies. Similar to the process by which bias can infiltrate and cloud human judgment, bias can also infiltrate and corrupt AI functionality. The two main ways that bias can hinder AI programs are called algorithmic bias and data bias. First, algorithmic bias is the idea that the algorithms underlying...